LSU is hosting a scientific photo exhibition and a lecture this fall, showcasing both the SOLEIL synchrotron research facility at the Campus Paris-Saclay in France and LSU’s own Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices.

Through Nov. 14, the lobby of LSU’s Middleton Library is hosting the photographic display, while a lecture in conjunction with the exhibit will take place in nearby Hill Memorial Library on Wednesday, Oct. 29. The exhibition and lectures series are free and open to the public.

The events are organized by the Office for Science & Technology at the Embassy of France in the United States and LSU CAMD. Partners for the project include photographer Vincent Moncorgé; Bloom Artist; the SOLEIL French national synchrotron facility; and the Centre National de la Recerche Scientifique.

An independent photographer based in Lyon, France, Moncorgé works as a photo journalist and portraitist with the national press, regional governments, companies and communication agencies. To celebrate the first decade of the SOLEIL synchrotron, a multidisciplinary instrument and research laboratory, Moncorgé spent day and night capturing the rich kaleidoscope of technologic and human skills on display at the laboratory.

To learn about the SOLEIL synchrotron facility, visit www.synchrotron-soleil.fr.

Similarly, CAMD is a synchrotron radiation research center at LSU. One of only seven in the U.S. and the only one in the South, information on LSU CAMD can be found at www.camd.lsu.edu.

Both CNRD Director of Research Amina Taleb-Ibrahimi and LSU Professor of Biological Sciences Marcia Newcomer will speak at the Oct. 29 lecture. Taleb-Ibrahimi will give a general overview of the synchrotron radiation, with a broad range of applications of high brilliance X-ray sources in different fields such as protein crystallography, medical sciences, environmental sciences, ancient materials, physics and chemistry.

Newcomer’s talk will be an overview of the variety of biomedical topics that can be addressed by LSU researchers using synchrotron radiation.