Here’s a football story from Easton Pitre:

“Back in 1971, the South Lafourche High School Tarpons had a very special football team. Their offense was great, but the defense was awesome. It became known as the ‘Possum Defense.’

“The state championship was at Tarpon Stadium in Galliano against Winnfield High School. That Friday morning, about a half hour before school took in, I could hear a terrific outburst of screaming and laughing in the hallways.

“As assistant principal in charge of discipline, I hurried out my office to see what was going on.

“Everyone was running out the back doors into the back yard — because 25 to 30 possums were running all over the yard.

“It seems the players had gone out into the woods the night before, and after capturing these possums let them loose on the school grounds.

“What could I do, except laugh with the rest?

“That night the Tarpons, behind their Possum Defense, defeated Winnfield 10-0 for the state championship.”

Home upgrade

Cameron Heltz addresses the issue of the ailing Mike VI, LSU’s tiger mascot, and the problem of replacing him:

“I have an idea for Mike VII — adopt the tiger at Tiger Truck Stop! Give him better surroundings, better care, etc.”

Yeah, and they could replace him with another caged wild animal — I think “Possum Truck Stop” has a nice ring to it...

Fair warning

Dave Hughes says, “There needs to be an app developed so that the people who text and drive can turn their turn signals on with their phone. That way they can let you know when they are going to cut you off.”

Sweet memory

Judy B. adds to our stories of encounters with the powdered sugar atop beignets:

“When I first moved to ‘Metry’ many years ago, I went to Morning Call.

“I had only recently started going there, and there was a couple from out of town watching me to see how to eat the beignets.

“I picked up the little tin powdered sugar shaker, turned it upside down and tapped on the bottom.

“Whoever had just filled it had not screwed the lid on. I had a plate that looked like a snow-covered mountain with beignets buried underneath.

“I had to tell them that was not the way to do it.”

The Voice

Mickey J. Brown says, “I would like to recognize the great job Chris Blair did announcing the LSU baseball ball games this season.

“He would have sounded better broadcasting from Omaha. We’ll hear that next year.”

Educational experience

Joanne T. Johnson says you’re never too old to learn something new. That’s why LSU Continuing Education offers OLLI (Olshan Lifelong Learning Institute) courses on a variety of subjects.

She says summer courses are right around the corner at several locations.

For course registration information visit: outreach.lsu.edu/olli. Or call (225) 578-2500 for guidance on how to register online.

Full disclosure: I’m teaching one of the courses, at St. James Place. It’s called “Why Writing a Column Is Better Than Working for a Living.”

Special People Dept.

— On Tuesday, June 21, Michael Landaiche, of St. Gabriel, celebrates his 90th birthday.

— Jim and Natalie Heard Elbourne celebrated their 73rd anniversary on Saturday, June 18.

Thought for the Day

Tom Miller, of Mandeville, offers this Chinese saying (he says it’s Zen, but it sounds suspiciously like something from a fortune cookie): “It is not necessary that you think so much.”

Secret remedy

Doug Johnson, of Watson, says, “Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see an ad for some product with a comment saying local people don’t want me to know about it.

“For example, an ad for some cure-all pill may say, ‘Denham Springs doctors don’t want you to know about this medicine.’

“Several times I have answered such ads with an email requesting the names of a couple of those doctors.

“So far no replies.”

Spitting image

Gene Duke says this lawyer story points out the danger of asking a courtroom witness a question when you don’t already know the answer:

“An attorney friend told me that early in his career he represented a man accused of biting another man’s ear off in a barroom fight.

“Although there were many witnesses, no one admitted to seeing the biting.

“But one witness testified that although she did not see the act, the lawyer’s client had indeed bitten the ear off.

“The lawyer pounced on this, asking, ‘If you did not see my client bite the ear off, how do you know he is guilty?’

“She replied, ‘I saw him spit it out.’”

Contacting Smiley

Write Smiley at Smiley@theadvocate.com. He can also be reached by fax at (225) 388-0351 or mail at P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.

Tags