Daryl Hudeck, Connie Aiden Pham

Houston Police SWAT officer Daryl Hudeck carries Catherine Pham and her 13-month-old son Aiden after rescuing them from their home surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, in Houston. The remnants of Hurricane Harvey sent devastating floods pouring into Houston Sunday as rising water chased thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) ORG XMIT: TXDP128

David J. Phillip

As disaster strikes in Texas, several nonprofit and religious organizations in Baton Rouge have directed people on how best to help their next-door neighbors.

Baton Rouge Area Foundation/Greater Houston Community Foundation

More than $167,000 of the $6 million the Baton Rouge Area Foundation raised last year after catastrophic floods devastated Baton Rouge came from generous next-door neighbors in Texas.

BRAF is now asking donors to return the favor by donating to the Greater Houston Community Foundation's Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Cajun Navy

After the Baton Rouge floods last year, many rescues were orchestrated by families, friends and neighbors who had boats and pulled people from the water. The Cajun Navy has now headed to Texas to help with rescues there.

The group has a PayPal page where people can donate to their efforts. The Cajun Navy umbrella encompasses many volunteer groups from south Louisiana who are helping with search and rescue. One is Cajun Coast Search and Rescue, which also has a PayPal page for donations. 

American Red Cross

The American Red Cross has set up a Hurricane Harvey fund. People can donate to it here.

Catholic Charities and Catholic Diocese

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston is collecting money for flood relief. 

Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Baton Rouge says cash is the best donation people can make. Baton Rouge Bishop Robert Muench released a statement late Sunday saying the Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge is making arrangements to offer both financial and spiritual support to those in Texas.

House mucking supplies being collected at Broadmoor United Methodist

Broadmoor United Methodist Church in Baton Rouge is collecting cleaning supplies to gut houses affected by the floods in Texas. People can drop off donations to the church's Connection Cafe.

They are hoping to deliver cleaning kits sometime later this week, and people can see specific instructions on what items they want and how to assemble the kits online.

The kits, and donated items they are looking for, include:

5-gallon bucks with resealable lids

Liquid laundry detergent

Liquid household cleaners

Dish soap

Air freshener

Bug spray

Scrub brushes

Cleaning wipes

Sponges

Scouring pads

Clothespins and clotheslines

Trash bags

Dust masks

Dishwashing gloves

Work gloves

Lamar Dixon Expo Center

People can drop off supplies starting at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the Lamar Dixon Expo Center to help those in Texas. Collections will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. there for the next week.

Volunteer Ascension and other groups will be collecting bottled water, work gloves, mold killer, baby wipes, hammers, rubber boots, toilet paper, vinegar, batteries, fans and toiletries there. They will not accept clothes and they are asking people not to try to donate any.

East Baton Rouge Council on Aging

The Council on Aging is accepting donations for seniors impacted by the floods from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at their headquarters at 5790 Florida Blvd. 

They are collecting nutritional supplements, water, canes, combs, adult diapers, walkers, denture cleaner, socks, underwear and other toiletries. 

One thing that groups donating truckloads of goods need to be aware of: provide the necessary documents. That includes a specific location for where the items will be dropped off, a specific phone number for the contact person who is receiving the goods and assurances that there will be people on hand to unload the truck. Cathy Gautreaux, executive director of the Louisiana Motor Transport Association, which represents the state’s trucking industry, said Texas law enforcement officials need this information for vehicles entering areas closed to traffic, or under curfews.

This story will be updated throughout the day.

Follow Andrea Gallo on Twitter, @aegallo.​