As the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina draws near, national news outlets across the country are covering the disaster and New Orleans' recovery with a series of reports, videos, photo slideshows and interactive graphics.

Tonight, CNN will air a documentary with host Anderson Cooper called "Katrina: The Storm That Never Stopped" at 8 p.m. It was originally scheduled to air Tuesday and pushed back again Wednesday.

The Weather Channel will also air "Katrina 2065," a look at what would happen if the storm hit New Orleans in 50 years, at 7 p.m. tonight.

Here's a look at how some other national media are covering the Katrina anniversary.

  • In an opinion piece for Politico, former FEMA director Michael Brown – whose nickname “Brownie” became synonymous with the federal government’s failures following Katrina – says that he was held responsible “for the things that I didn’t control at all.” He points to then-New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin and former Gov. Kathleen Blanco as those who had authority to do something, but did not. “People are still saying now, as they said then, that what went wrong in New Orleans a decade ago was all my fault. They were wrong then, and they are wrong now.”
  • Hurricane Katrina exposed the country’s unwillingness to protect black citizens from disaster, according to an article in ESPN. Ten years later, racial disparity continues to become more and more evident, the article says. “The progress of a first black president, princess or Super Bowl coach is offset by the weight of a growing racial wealth gap, devastating violence in black neighborhoods, and continued police killings of unarmed black people.”
  • The hotel and tourism industry in New Orleans has partly recovered, according to an article in Fortune magazine. But numbers show that the city is only at the same place it was before Katrina hit. ”We’re basically back to the same amount of hotel rooms – 38,000 – and we have gone from roughly 800 restaurants to over 1,400 restaurants,” Mark Romig, president of The New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation, tells the magazine.
  • TIME has gathered 10 articles from its archive on Hurricane Katrina, including its cover story the week after Katrina hit, an article on the evacuees returning to New Orleans, and its perspective on the fifth anniversary in 2010. (Some links require subscription)
  • New York Times Senior Editor for News Operations Walter Baranger writes that Hurricane Katrina was a turning point for the Times. “Since our newsroom moved to computers in 1978, there have been two major eras at The Times: Before Hurricane Katrina, and after,” he writes. At one point, the Times had nearly 100 staff reporting on Katrina from around the country.
  • This weekend, the Superdome will be filled with cheering fans for the New Orleans Saints’ preseason game against the Houston Texans. But longtime Superdome manager Doug Thornton also remembers trying to keep the Dome “on life support” after thousands evacuated there after Katrina. "When I'm at a game, it's totally out of mind. But it's usually when I'm alone at night or in here on a Saturday or Sunday, it's kind of eerie. Because you can almost hear the voices, you can hear the crowd, you can smell the smell," Thornton tells ESPN.
  • A story from U.S. News & World Report highlights the Lower Ninth Ward and its efforts to rebuild the neighborhood after Katrina. “St Bernard coming up. Uptown coming up. Canal Street coming up. Every part of town coming up but the Ninth Ward, and I think they forgot about us,” one resident said.
  • The Washington Post shows the monster hurricane in 10 terrifying images, including satellite, radar and infrared images during peak intensity.
  • The New York Times has an interactive on New Orleans’ recovery and the way the city shifted after Katrina. “Ten years later, it is not exactly right to say that New Orleans is back. The city did not return, not as it was,” it says.
  • For several reasons, there’s still no official number on how many people died in the storm, according to the website FiveThirtyEight. “There is still no memorial listing the names of Katrina victims, still no way to know how many remain uncounted or unidentified, and still no agreement on how to count victims if a storm of Katrina’s impact hits the U.S. again,” the article says. “Ten years on, we’re still in the dark.”
  • Ten years after Katrina, the Huffington Post writes that Louisiana is becoming a model for climate change adaption planning. The state has planned for the effects of climate change, even if some in the state don't call it that, the article says.

Other Katrina anniversary specials on TV:

--CNN will air a documentary with host Anderson Cooper called "Katrina: The Storm That Never Stopped" at 8 p.m. Thursday. It was originally scheduled to air Tuesday and pushed back again Wednesday.

--The Weather Channel will air "Katrina 2065," a look at what would happen if the storm hit New Orleans in 50 years, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 27.