A new federal Superfund site in Louisiana is the most recent addition to the state’s 27 existing areas identified as legacy pollution sites, meaning they are eligible for federal Superfund money for cleanup.

The new site announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday is the 32-acre Colonial Creosote site located southeast of Bogalusa in Washington Parish.

The facility was a wood-treating facility from 1911 to 1953 that used creosote as a preservative. Most recently, the site was home to Bogalusa Concrete, which stopped operations in 2008. The state Department of Environmental Quality asked EPA to evaluate the site in 2011 for inclusion in the National Priorities List, better known as the Superfund list, according to a release from EPA.

EPA found that creosote was in the soil and groundwater near the site and contamination mainly consisted of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are a suspected cancer-causing material. PAH’s also have been linked to reproductive problems and birth defects in animals, according to EPA.

In a separate action, the EPA also proposed adding the 98-acre SBA Shipyard in Jennings, in Jefferson Davis Parish, to the list.

Located in the southwest area of the Mermentau River, the facility was used to repair and maintain barges that contained diesel, coal tar, creosote and crude oil from 1965 to 1999.

DEQ proposed the site for listing in 2012.

The Superfund federal program was formed 35 years ago to identify and clean up industrial waste from sites that largely started operating before environmental laws went into effect.