Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is slated to take part in a GOP presidential forum in Greenville, South Carolina later this week.

Heritage Action for America, the event’s sponsor, has also lined up confirmations from Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, Scott Walker, Chris Christie, Carly Fiorina, Rick Santorum and, yes, Donald Trump. Others in the race, including U.S. Sen. Lindsay Graham of South Carolina, didn’t make the cut for the event, which was based on recent polling data.

Republican presidential candidate, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, speaks at the Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, July 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Republican presidential candidate, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, speaks at the Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, July 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

A firm schedule has not been released, but candidates were asked to reserve time from 4-10 p.m. Eastern Friday to participate. More than 10,000 attendees have registered to attend the forum, which will be hosted by South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, former Sen. Jim Demint and Heritage Action’s Mike Needham.

Jindal, who still struggles to gain traction nationally in a race that has Trump dominating headlines and airwaves.

New York billionaire and reality TV star Trump and Carson continue to lead the crowded GOP field in two new polls out Tuesday. Jindal, meanwhile, continues to languish at the back of the pack in both the New York Times/CBS poll and Washington Post/ABC News poll.

The Washington Post/ABC News poll has Jindal at 1 percent among likely Republican voters. The CBS/New York Times poll gave Jindal an asterisk — meaning less than 0.5 percent. Worth noting: About 63 percent of Republican voters surveyed in the CBS/NYT poll say that it’s still too early and they could change their minds.

Jindal’s set to take part in CNN’s second-tier early debate Wednesday, along with Santorum, Graham and former New York Gov. George Pataki. The two latest polls have all of them at 1 percent or less.

Some pundits have suggested Jindal has the best chance of a Fiorina-style breakthrough during Wednesday’s early debate, but CNN has confirmed to the New York Times that it will be focusing on getting the main-stage candidates to go head-to-head. That could easily translate to more headline-grabbing interactions there that overshadow what has been dubbed the “kiddie table” or “happy hour” debate among the lower-polling candidates.

When asked about Jindal’s debate preparations last week, campaign adviser Curt Anderson joked that the governor would be “studying the names of all the leaders in the Middle East,” adding that Jindal doesn’t need much prep.

“If you’ve ever been around him, you know he’s a tremendously fluid, learned, well-rounded person,” he said.