Althea Ashe says Harriet St.Amant’s recent groaner (“When the Saints Go Margarine”) “reminded me of the ‘Paula Deen Cruise’ that my 88-year-old mom (Sarah Corkern) and I took recently.

“When we entered the piano bar, the pianist was leading the enthusiastic crowd in a rendition of Tennessee’s fight song, ‘Rocky Top.’

“Of course that was followed by die-hard LSU fans requesting ‘Hey, Fighting Tigers.’

“When the pianist did not know that one, there were requests for ‘When the Saints Go Marching In.’

“Again the pianist was clueless.

“I volunteered my mom to play both songs. After her rousing rendition, she received a standing ovation and was invited back the next night to play a full set!

“She began that one with ‘Jambalaya, crawfish pie …’

“The LSU/Louisiana/Cajun spirit was alive and well-represented in the middle of the Caribbean!”

Get it in writing

Here’s what will probably be the last word on attempts to cook Cajun-style outside Louisiana:

Debra H. Naquin says, “My husband Sammy is a professional Cajun zydeco musician who tours around the country.

“Sometimes the sponsors have host families to house and feed the band members when they are in their town playing.

“While they enjoy the hospitality of their host families, it is stated in the contract ‘No Cajun cooking please’ when referring to the meals.

“They had to put this in their contract after they almost starved to death while touring in the Frozen Nawth!”

Creative editing

One of the things you leave journalism school with is a passion for editing.

I knew J-School classmates who corrected graffiti on restroom walls.

In the coffee area off The Advocate’s newsroom, someone installed a toaster next to the microwave.

Soon this sign showed up: “Do not run toaster and microwave at the same time.”

Then some editor couldn’t resist changing “at the same time” to “simultaneously.”

Going Green

Anita Young Adams says, “I have been reading the S&H Green Stamp stories for the past few weeks.

“They brought back a Green Stamp memory.

“When I got married in 1976, one of my favorite wedding gifts was several full Green Stamp books and a catalog.

“I was told to shop for what I wanted, then redeem them at the Green Stamp store.

“I remember being so excited when I ‘purchased’ a large sunburst kitchen wall clock and a set of TV trays.

“It was the 1976 equivalent of a Walmart gift card!”

Good Samaritans

Willa Perry of Greenwell Springs says she was coming out of the Central Walmart with her daughter

when she tripped and had a hard fall:

“My purse went flying, spilling all the contents.

“While my daughter was trying to get me back on my feet, a very nice lady came to help us.

“She helped me to our car and saw that I was in safely.

“I guess I was a little dazed and didn’t ask her name.

“So I hope she is a reader of your column and will know how much we appreciated her help.”

Flying flags

A reader says, “I would like to commend the residents of Woodlawn subdivision on their patriotism.

“Over the 4th of July weekend every home had a 2-foot American flag on their lawn at the sidewalk.

“I do not live in the subdivision, but it gave me great pleasure to drive through and see the display.

“The effect was very heartwarming.”

Bumper philosophy

Our mention of memorable bumper stickers reminded Mike Blouin of a classic his brother Buck’s ‘66 Chevelle sported:

“I AM NEITHER FOR NOR AGAINST APATHY.”

And Roy Miller says, “One of the bumper stickers I’ve never forgotten was on a small car driven by — not surprisingly — a teenage girl.

“Its brief message: ‘BOYS LIE,’ written in large blue letters.

“I’ve always wanted to know the story behind that one … ”

Groaner of the Week

Chuck from Elizabethtown, Ky., has the nerve to tell me this tale:

“Being in the cellular phone business, I was shocked the other day when a technician told me that one of our cellular antennas had married another antenna.

“Report was that the wedding was nothing special, but the reception was outstanding!”

Write Smiley at Smiley@theadvocate.com. He can also be reached by fax at (225) 388-0351 or mail at P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.