Celebrate Father’s Day with your health. Men need to let doctors look under the hood.

We have an attitude in our culture — if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it! In reality, men do more preventative maintenance on their cars and lawns than on their bodies. But, this attitude should never be applied to health.

Many men don’t receive checkups because they feel that they have a big “S” tattooed on their chests — but no one is Superman. On average, women live 5 to 7 years longer than men. That gap could close if men practiced preventive health as often as women. Fortunately, men’s attitude and behavior is slowly changing.

Not surprisingly, impotence drugs have lured men into the doctor’s office, which is half the battle and usually leads to a prostate screening. Over the years, public awareness campaigns, at-work health screenings and overall understanding of the male patient have aided in improving men’s health.

Before the 1990s, there were no male equivalents to the Pap test or mammogram. But now, the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) — the screening test for prostate cancer — is detecting problems early, giving men a myriad of treatment options and, more importantly, saving lives.

This means more time to enjoy their golden years, more time to walk their daughters down the aisle and more time to watch their grandchildren grow. Don’t wait for prostate cancer or other diseases to hit close to home; don’t wait for symptoms.

The only waiting should be done in your doctor’s waiting room.

Neil Baum

urologist

New Orleans