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FILE - This Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 file photo shows the U.S. Capitol at dawn as Senate Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill this week, in Washington. Without a single Democratic vote, Republicans in Congress pushed through a sweeping $1.5 trillion tax overhaul that would cut corporate taxes, while producing mixed results for individuals. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

J. Scott Applewhite

The new year is going to be a big one in politics. Both the Senate and House could wind up in either party's hands, lots of state houses are up for grabs, and the guy in the White House has proven a potent rallying point for the resistance. The very direction of our country feels like it's at stake.

Louisianans loves their politics as much as anyone, but this time around, we're likely going to relegated to the spectator section.

There's no Senate seat up for grabs, and no sign that any of the state's six House members plan to retire and create a vacancy. Louisiana has no swing districts, the kind that realistically could switch from one party to the other. The governor, other statewide officials and the entire Legislature won't face voters until 2019.

It's going to be a change of pace after a consequential stretch that gave the state two new U.S. senators and a new governor, plus new mayors for Baton Rouge and New Orleans. So far, the biggest race on the 2018 calendar is the contest in Jefferson Parish to replace sheriff-turned-talk show host Newell Normand.

Then again, we're only two days into the year, and if 2017 is any guide, 2018 could well have some surprises in store. In an era in which Alabama can host a hotly contested Senate race — and the Democrat can emerge on top — it's fair to expect the unexpected.

Follow Stephanie Grace on Twitter, @stephgracela.