1. What we learned

LSU isn’t really a top-10 team. Mississippi State might be. The Bulldogs invaded Tiger Stadium, a place where they hadn’t won in 23 years and did their best LSU impression. They ran the ball at will, threw effectively and stuffed the Tigers’ ability to outmuscle the opposition with their running game, which netted just 89 yards. That the Tigers were throwing for the win at the end speaks to the heart of this team, but for most of the game they were seriously dominated. LSU’s QB controversy may have been reignited by Brandon Harris’ late heroics.

2. Trending now

Dak Prescott has definitely arrived. You may debate whether he’s a legitimate Heisman Trophy candidate or not, but with LSU smelling blood after returning his fumble for a touchdown to make it 17-10 to start the third quarter, Prescott responded with a 56-yard touchdown keeper and scrambled out of trouble to hit Jameon Lewis on a 74-yard TD pass that snuffed out LSU’s last hope. That’s what good players do when faced with adversity. The Tigers had better hope he’s the best dual-threat quarterback they see.

3. Final thoughts

For much of the night LSU looked like the embodiment of that Robert Redford movie, “All is Lost.” And then came the comeback. The Tigers nearly stole one, but the fact remains they were outplayed for 31/2 quarters of this game. To quote Dennis Green, perhaps they are who we thought they were: a talented, flawed, inexperienced, hard-to-figure team that can win and lose on virtually any given week with equal ability. Hold on, Tigers fans. This promises to be a bumpy ride.