HAMPTON, Ga. — Kasey Kahne grabbed the lead on the restart following a caution with 23 laps remaining and held off Matt Kenseth in a two-lap shootout to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Atlanta Motor Speedway on Sunday night.

Kahne’s first win of the season earned him a spot in the Chase for the Sprint cup. Kenseth also qualified for the Chase on points.

Denny Hamlin was third, followed by Jimmie Johnson, Carl Edwards and Danica Patrick.

Meanwhile, Tony Stewart’s much-anticipated return to racing ended a little more than halfway through the race.

Stewart hit the wall for the second time after his right front tire blew out on Lap 172, ending his night with a 41st-place finish.

It was Stewart’s first race since the sprint car he was driving struck and killed 20-year-old Kevin Ward Jr. in an Aug. 9 race at a dirt track in upstate New York. The fatal wreck is still under investigation.

With only two laps remaining and Kahne holding a solid lead over Kevin Harvick, Martin Truex Jr. and Kyle Busch collided, forcing a caution flag and the first shootout.

Kahne, who had four fresh tires, started behind Kenseth and Hamlin on the final restart.

Harvick, who also won the Nationwide Series race on Saturday night, started from the pole and led the first 80 laps.

Logano, who won last week at Bristol, finished 14th.

Stewart’s problems started when he went into the wall earlier in the race following a collision with Kyle Busch.

Kenseth began the night fifth in the points race, but not yet locked into the Chase because he had no wins. Kenseth needed to finish seventh or better to secure his place in the playoffs.

IndyCar

Power wins IndyCar series title behind Kanaan: In Fontana, Calif., Will Power won his first IndyCar Series championship Saturday night, finishing ninth in the final race and claiming the season title after a career filled with agonizing misses.

Tony Kanaan won the 500-mile, double-points race at Fontana for his first victory of the season, but Power drove with just enough aggression to preserve his healthy points lead.

After briefly taking the lead late, Power comfortably held off second-place teammate Helio Castroneves and wrapped up Team Penske’s first IndyCar title since 2006.

“That’s 15 years of hard work,” Power said. “Started taking it seriously in 2000, and that’s 15 years of hard work. ... It’s just surreal, man. I can’t believe it.”

Starting from the back after a poor qualifying run, Power patiently picked his way through the field to the front. After a restart late in the race, the Australian roared into the lead with authority.

, showing he wasn’t about to back into his first title.

With much more relief than elation, Power celebrated overcoming his still-fresh memories of heartbreak in recent seasons. He led the IndyCar points standings heading into the final race in 2010 and 2012, and he led with two races left in 2011 — but he failed to claim the title each time.

“That was one of the hardest races ever,” Power said. “Oh my God, I was crying. It just went on and on. I slowly made up position, and it was great. ... I’m was so mentally exhausted right now. My hands are numb from holding onto the wheel so tight.”

Power’s mother and wife watched from the pit area, sometimes turning their heads away in nervousness as the laps wound down and the specter of Power’s past loomed.

They didn’t need to worry: The pride of Toowoomba, Australia, finally is a champion.

Castroneves was essentially finished after a drive-through penalty for a pit entry violation with 31 laps to go, sliding out of the groove onto the track on his way into the pits. The penalty paved a championship finish for Power, who has been dinged numerous times this season by pit road penalties.

Castroneves, who has also fallen repeatedly short of the title, warmly congratulated Power.

“It’s great. You’re talking about the team, obviously,” Castroneves said.

Power struggled in qualifying on Friday night, finishing next-to-last in the 22-driver field. Rookie Mikhail Aleshin’s frightening crash late in a practice session reduced the field, but it didn’t change Power’s strategy.

Power intentionally dropped back to last on the opening lap, avoiding any chance of early trouble before attempting to work his way up the field. He moved ahead steadily and cautiously during the first 100 laps, cracking the top 10 with little drama while other teams struggled with downforce and speeding penalties.

Their Penske teammate, Juan Pablo Montoya, led the most laps at Fontana.

Kanaan earned his first victory of the season for his new Target Chip Ganassi Racing team, and the 17th of his career.