Just where is “local?” In the food world these days, the answer is everywhere, from grocery store ads to restaurant menus to the rapidly growing ranks of grassroots brands and homegrown suppliers.

But for as much as local food has become common parlance, and in some settings the industry standard, the Eat Local Challenge can still shake things up. In the weeks ahead, for instance, a series of events scheduled in conjunction with the Eat Local Challenge will bring a “trash fish” happy hour and a wild game cook out; a DIY food swap; a true farm-to-table, you-pick-it, you-cook-it lunch; an all-local breakfast; and a native foods dinner held on a rooftop over Central City.

“I think these events are fun, and it goes beyond just saying ‘eat what’s local,’” said Lee Stafford, the event’s co-founder. “These things push the envelope and give us a chance to talk about what foods are indigenous, what’s being underutilized or wasted, what offers an alternative.”

Now in its fifth year, the main thrust of the Eat Local Challenge remains the same. The “challenge” is an appeal to people to eat foods sourced exclusively within a 200-mile radius of New Orleans during the month of June.

People who register get a starter kit with product samples, discounts from suppliers and other swag, and they pick a level of participation they think they can handle (from a strictly local diet to intermittent all-local meals). The event also takes place across restaurants, with close to 60 of them pledging to offer at least one Eat Local Challenge-compliant dish on their menus during June. These run the gamut from bars, cafes and pizzerias to elegant dinner destinations.

Many of the events planned for the month are open to the general public. Some focus on growing your own food; others are built around tastings, parties and social outings that show different possibilities for eating local.

Many of the events planned for the month are open to the general public. Some focus on growing your own food (see more on these in Saturday’s EatPlayLive section); others are built around tastings, parties and social outings that show different possibilities for eating local. Here are a few highlights in the days and weeks ahead.

Kick-Off Party

Saturday, May 30, 6-8:30 p.m.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 O.C. Haley Blvd.

Taste locally-sourced dishes prepared by chefs from Rouses Markets and from nearby restaurants including Irish House, Purloo and Primitivo, the new Central City restaurant from Adolfo Garcia and Jared Ralls. Get ideas for dishes to cook during the month and sip drinks, including “garden-to-glass” cocktails, from regional producers. Attendees can sign up for the Eat Local Challenge on site. Free admission.

Bycatch Happy Hour

June 4, 5-6 p.m.

Carmo, 527 Julia St.

Sample Gulf seafood varieties that rarely make to restaurant menus, get a drink from the Carmo bar and meet other curious diners, local restaurateurs and chefs and some of the fishermen who provided the catch.

“Last year we got these little Gulf squid, this Gulf whiting that was just fantastic, we did some raw preparations, some grilled,” said Carmo proprietor Dana Honn. “This year we won’t know (the seafood selection) until we hear from the fishermen, but that’s how it goes with this stuff.” Free admission.

Garden, Shop and Cook at the ReFresh Project

June 6, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, 300 N. Broad St.

Culinary instructor Leah Sarris begins this hands-on event in the ReFresh Community Farm to harvest vegetables, continues with an educational shopping trip inside the adjacent Whole Foods Market and then moves to Tulane’s new, on-site teaching kitchen where participants prepare a family-style meal. Tickets are $10 for Eat Local Challenge participants; $15 for others. Sign up online at culinarymedicine.org.

OCH Local Foods Fest

Sat, June 6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 O.C. Haley Blvd.

This multi-faceted fest offers a wide range activities and local tastes, including a gathering of DIY food producers showing off their homemade goods. Caramel, fig tea and pecan “milk” have been some notable past examples, and Stafford is particularly excited about the addition this year of rice noodles. Producers on hand generally swap or sell their goods, and offer samples to curious festival goers. The fest will also feature a bycatch fish fry and wild game grilled up at barbecue stations outside and served in sample sizes.

“We’ll have rabbit, nutria, raccoon, maybe squirrel,” said Stafford.

There will also be a pig roast to round out the food options. Free admission.

Breakfast of Champions

June 13, 9:30-11 a.m.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 O.C. Haley Blvd.

Hosted with the Louisiana Egg Commission, start the day with omelets and crepes with local ham, cheese, vegetables and, of course eggs, all from local suppliers. Free admission.

Wild Edibles Dinner Party

June 26, 6-9 p.m.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 O.C. Haley Blvd.

Held on the rooftop, this ticketed dinner will center on a menu of purely indigenous Louisiana ingredients, including meat, seafood and plants that were staples of the diet for native people before the arrival of Europeans. While the menu will not be set until closer to the event, corn, purslaine, persimmons, wild lettuces, mayhaws and wild greens are some examples of what could be in store.

“Many of these wild plants have higher nutritional values than cultivated ones,” Stafford said. “If there’s more interest in them, if they’re on more menus, there can be more of a market for them and farmers will grow more of them”

Tickets are $50. For details, see nolalocavore.org.

Follow Ian McNulty on Twitter @IanMcNultyNOLA.