Exclusive: Curator’s top picks from ‘Visions of US’ at NOMA _lowres

Photo by Roman Alokhin - Katie Pfohl, NOMA’s Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and curator of the “Visions of US” exhibition.

Katie Pfohl, NOMA’s Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and curator of the “Visions of US” exhibition, shares five don’t-miss works from the show exclusively for Advocate readers.

1. François Fleischbein (American/German, 1804-1868)

Portrait of a Free Woman of Color, circa 1833-1835

This portrait, painted by German immigrant artist François Fleischbein, reflects the great cultural diversity and dynamic, multicultural nature of New Orleans during the mid-19th century.

2. Alfred Boisseau (American/French, 1823-1901)

Louisiana Indians Walking Along a Bayou, 1847

Alfred Boisseau immigrated to New Orleans from France to create sensitive portraits of Louisiana’s Native American peoples. His paintings traveled the world to be shown in New Orleans, New York and Paris.

3. Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943)

The Ice Hole, Maine, 1908

Marsden Hartley used bold colors and dynamic shapes and forms to capture his raw emotional response to the Maine landscape of his childhood.

4. Clementine Hunter (American, 1886/87-1988)

Chevron Quilt, circa 1951

Clementine Hunter was a self-taught artist from rural Louisiana whose paintings and quilts are prized for a strikingly modern sensibility that resembles much abstract art being made during the same period.

5. Frank Stella (American, born 1936)

Scramble: Ascending Yellow Values, Descending Spectrum, 1978

This painting’s rhythmic ascending and descending planes of color reflect the influence of music and dance, involving the body and all of the senses in the experience of the artwork.