As phones get smarter and computers get faster, camping, running and biking products become more technologically advanced, too.

Here are some gadgets and gear ideas for gifts — or maybe to make your own fitness goals a little easier.

Charge Cooker Maxi 1 fat bike

Cold-climate mountain bikers created bicycles with big, fat tires so they could ride in the snow, but now these fat bikes have become popular all over the country. The 4-inch-wide fat tires roll over roots and can tackle any terrain, from mud to sand.

“It just smooths it out,” said Clayton Weeks, manager at Capitol Cyclery on Essen Lane. “They run at much lower tire pressure, so it’s a much smoother ride.”

Some buy the no-nonsense bicycles for riding at the beach or across fields on the farm. Outdoors lovers can mount gun racks or fishing poles to the frame to ride deep into forests that do not allow motor vehicles.

$1,300 at Capitol Cyclery

Beach cruiser models, such as the Sun Bicycles Crusher, start at $500

Goal Zero Nomad 7 solar panel

You don’t have to leave behind the modern world while enjoying the outdoors. This solar panel can charge cell phones or any other device that plugs into a USB port, which now includes hiking headlamps, lanterns and iPods.

“They make this so you can strap it onto your backpack while you’re on the go,” said Walter Paolucci, manager of The Backpacker.

Hikers say the panel can charge most cell phones within one to two hours, so your devices never go dead.

$79 at The Backpacker

Nathan Zephyr Fire 100 Hand Torch

For working out on short winter days, reflective clothing and flashing lights are a must for runners who want to be seen early in the morning and later at night. The rear of the Zephyr flashes red to alert drivers, while the steady light in front illuminates the path.

“This is for people to see you and so you can see so you’re not going to fall,” said Michell Forte, owner of Fleet Feet.

Built into the Zephyr’s grip is a button that activates a loud emergency siren for added security on solo runs.

$45 at Fleet Feet and Varsity Sports

Run With Me gloves

These gloves protect your fingers from the cold, but the technology-friendly fingertips allow you to use the touchscreen on a smartphone or music player.

Lululemon’s Rulu fabric draws sweat away from the hands while also keeping the extremities warm, said Hayden Clark, a sales associate at Lululemon.

“It’s going to keep you a little warmer than most sweat-wicking material because it’s cottony,” he said.

$28 at Lululemon

Outdoor Technology Buckshot wireless speaker

This tiny speaker connects wirelessly to a smartphone or a digital music player so you can have tunes wherever you go.

“It’s extremely durable and has great sound quality,” said Steven Sickinger, sales manager at Massey’s Outfitters.

The Buckshot comes with a bicycle handlebar mount so any cyclist can listen to music without headphones, which can silence the cars around them.

$40 at Massey’s Outfitters

Fitbit Flex and Tory Burch Bracelet

Exercise scientists recommend activity trackers like the Flex to anyone interested in changing their lifestyles. Keeping track of how much you move is a great first step to losing weight, researchers say.

But many of these wristbands and clip-on trackers just aren’t that attactive. Designer Tory Burch has created a swappable series of bracelets that hide the activity tracker, so no one has to know you count your steps.

Flex activity tracker $100 at Academy Sports + Outdoors and Best Buy; Tory Burch bracelet $38 to $175 at ToryBurch.com

Garmin Forerunner watch

Garmin running watches use GPS satellites to track your distance and speed. The new Forerunner 25 also connects with smartphones via Bluetooth technology so you can upload runs to the Garmin Connect application and keep track of every mile.

While many companies now market running watches, Varsity Sports sales associate Matt Brouillette recommends Garmin products because of the company’s customer service.

“You don’t have to ever worry about it being a dud,” he said.

$100 and up at Varsity Sports and Fleet Feet