In November, Echosmith, a young band with a hot career, celebrated sales of 1 million for “Cool Kids.”

“Cool Kids” went Top 10 at Top 40 radio and Top 10 on the iTunes singles chart. The song shows how influenced the Los Angeles-based Echosmith is by the melodic British pop music of the 1980s.

Echosmith, which appears at the House of Blues on Wednesday, Feb. 18, features Sydney Sierota and her brothers Jamie, Noah and Graham. Ages 16 to 21, the Sierota siblings love the music of the Smiths, New Order and, a slightly pre-’80s band that helped set the sound of the ’80s, Joy Division.

“The ’80s era was really influential on us as we were growing up,” said the vivacious 17-year-old Sydney Sierota. “We love bands like Coldplay and the Killers, too, but ’80s music was the big one for us.

“Those songs have so much melody,” she explained. “Melody in the bass line or the keyboard or the guitar. It wasn’t always just from a vocal. Sometimes, lately, people forget that you can be more creative with melodies.”

The Sierota siblings’ father is a songwriter and their mother is an artist.

“They’re into music and arts, which was helpful for us,” Sierota said. “There were (musical) instruments everywhere. We weren’t forced in any way. It was sort of, ‘Well, this is here, and we love music anyway.’ ”

The siblings played individually before forming a group seven years ago, when Sierota was 10. Her brothers, Jamie, 21, and Noah, 19, had been in a few bands with friends before Echosmith, but Echosmith is the first band for younger Sierota siblings Sydney and Graham, 16.

Following the October 2013 release of Echosmith’s album debut, “Talking Dreams,” 2014 became the group’s breakout year. VH1 named the band a You Oughta Know artist and MTV named it an Artist to Watch. The group toured extensively and played the late-night TV talk show circuit.

Sierota spoke last week during a short break in Echosmith’s performance schedule. The Sierotas had just returned from a three-week promotional tour of Europe.

The group’s European reception has been a sort of accelerated version of its rise in the U.S.

“It was fun and crazy,” Sierota said of the band’s visit to Europe. “We were in a different country every day. It was hectic but it was a good time. They may speak different languages, but they still relate our songs.”

“Cool Kids,” which has received more than 24 million YouTube views, is one such song.

“If you’re an honest songwriter, I think that someone’s going to relate to it,” Sierota said. “That song is about how everyone has that desire to fit in at some point, no matter who you are or how old your are or what position you may be in life. So many people relate to that feeling. It’s crazy. The whole message of the song is respect yourself and be OK with who are.”