300 Mandeville

A summer home in Mandeville in 1909

LSU Library Images

Mandeville, created as a resort town, has seen its fortunes and its populations rise as access to its shores has improved. The town was founded in 1834 by New Orleans’ nobleman Jean-Bernard Xavier Philippe de Marigny de Mandeville, more commonly known as Bernard de Marigny. While Marigny lived in New Orleans – the Faubourg Marigny was developed by him in the early 1800s – he also had land north of Lake Pontchartrain that included a plantation on what is now Fontainebleau State Park. Following the success of subdividing his Marigny plantation, he had Louis Bringer develop plans for the town of Mandeville on his Northshore property. Marigny dictated that most streets be 50 feet wide, and lots be 60 feet x 90 feet. The lots were advertised in New Orleans’ newspapers and Marigny provided transportation to the new town by steamship.

Marigny, however, had to sell the plantation in 1852 and few people lived in Mandeville during the Civil War. The town gained popularity as a resort in the late 1800s, and was connected to New Orleans by ship and rail. In 1956, the Causeway Bridge was completed, providing direct access from New Orleans to the town. The town’s population grew from 1,740 in 1960 to 2,571 in 1970 and 6,000 in 1980. Today, the city has about 12,000 residents.

Mandeville, created as a resort town, has seen its fortunes and its populations rise as access to its shores has improved. The town was founded in 1834 by New Orleans’ nobleman Jean-Bernard Xavier Philippe de Marigny de Mandeville, more commonly known as Bernard de Marigny. While Marigny lived in New Orleans – the Faubourg Marigny was developed by him in the early 1800s – he also had land north of Lake Pontchartrain that included a plantation on what is now Fontainebleau State Park. Following the success of subdividing his Marigny plantation, he had Louis Bringer develop plans for the town of Mandeville on his Northshore property. Marigny dictated that most streets be 50 feet wide, and lots be 60 feet x 90 feet. The lots were advertised in New Orleans’ newspapers and Marigny provided transportation to the new town by steamship.

Marigny, however, had to sell the plantation in 1852 and few people lived in Mandeville during the Civil War. The town gained popularity as a resort in the late 1800s, and was connected to New Orleans by ship and rail. In 1956, the Causeway Bridge was completed, providing direct access from New Orleans to the town. The town’s population grew from 1,740 in 1960 to 2,571 in 1970 and 6,000 in 1980. Today, the city has about 12,000 residents.