A transgender woman wanted for allegedly killing another transgender woman with illegal silicone injections surrendered to New Orleans police Monday afternoon.

Police http://www.houstonlwsforum.org/documents/SjolanderPresentation.pdfhttp://theadvocate.com/home/959456-79/police-action-cleared.htmlhttp://theadvocate.com/home/8089996-125/cold-case-killing-haunts-brhttp://theadvocate.com/home/6459751-125/br-detective-agrees-to-settlehttp://theadvocate.com/home/8656622-125/detective-city-parish-want-judge-tohttp://www.theneworleansadvocate.com/home/9102096-172/nopd-issues-negligent-homicide-warrant-in">issued a warrant last week for negligent homicide for Armani Nicole Davenport, 33, after the Orleans Parish Coroner’s Office recently determined Brenisha Hall, 25, died of the injections to her hips and buttocks.

Davenport — who was born Larry Bernard — was booked on the homicide count after she turned herself in at NOPD headquarters about 3:30 p.m., said Officer Frank Robertson, a department spokesman.

Bail was not immediately set, according to Orleans Parish Prison records.

Hall — who was born Brad Hall — was injected early Oct. 24. She was rushed to Interim LSU Hospital later that morning in respiratory distress and soon fell into a coma.

She remained unconscious for weeks, and even though she later woke up, the chemicals injected into her body proved too toxic. She died Jan. 1 of complications from injections of a silicone-like substance, the Coroner’s Office said, although the homicide classification did not come until many weeks later.

Davenport initially was booked with negligent injuring after Hall was hospitalized.

Despite an open criminal investigation into the matter, hospital officials did not notify New Orleans police or the Orleans Parish coroner about the death. Instead, they alerted the Jefferson Parish Coroner’s Office because Hall lived in that parish.

Officials with the Jefferson office didn’t know about the pending criminal investigation in Orleans Parish and therefore gave the hospital the green light to autopsy the body, then release it to the family.

Orleans Parish officials were not made aware of the death until contacted by The New Orleans Advocate a day before Hall’s funeral.

Negligent homicide carries a maximum prison sentence of five years.

Follow Danny Monteverde on Twitter, @DCMonteverde.