Scores of demonstrators descended on Lee Circle late Wednesday to protest the election of Donald J. Trump, waving placards that read "Not my president" and setting fire to an effigy of the Manhattan businessman.

The protesters marched through the Central Business District and French Quarter, chanting and speaking out against the president-elect, whom they rejected as bigoted and unfit to serve as the nation's leader.

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See additional videos of the protest on facebook.com/TheAdvocateNewOrleans

 

The protest, organized on Facebook, was among several similar demonstrations that occurred around the nation on Wednesday, hours after Trump's upset victory over Hillary Clinton, who had been widely predicted to win the election. 

"Trump is a clear and present danger with his rhetoric in our country," said one of the protesters, 33-year-old David Nowak. "If he is going to be president, he needs to be held accountable."

Tyler Gamble, a New Orleans Police Department spokesman, said no arrests had been made as of about 8:45 p.m., but that a summons was issued to one man "who got into a physical fight with some of the protesters."

Gamble appeared to be referring to a Trump supporter who drove a pickup around Lee Circle about a half-dozen times, shouting at the protesters. Some demonstrators said the man was yelling racial slurs.

The fight broke out when one of the protesters grabbed a flag from the Trump supporter's truck. Another man later intervened to break up the fight. 

Police also were investigating a number of instances of property damage, including spray-paintings and the shattering of windows at a Chase Bank on St. Charles Avenue.

About 7 p.m., the group began to march toward the French Quarter. There was a discussion as to where they should march, with some suggesting they should block a highway.

During the march, protesters vandalized windows at a Chase Bank on St. Charles Avenue, according to a report from WWL-TV.

Anti-Trump protests were held in several cities throughout the United States today, from California to Massachusetts.