Special report: Slower, 'unacceptable' New Orleans police response times have become norm; see average wait times by area _lowres

Advocate staff photo by SCOTT THRELKELD -- New Orleans police arrive to a call of a domestic dispute 36 minutes after it was dispatched Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, in New Orleans East. Police units arrived at 9:03 a.m., and talked to the female resident for eight minutes before leaving. A male walked away from the residence at 8:55 a.m. before police arrived. The 36 minutes between dispatch and arrival at the scene does not take into account when the 911 call was received. Across the city, New Orleans police are taking more than three times longer to respond to a typical call than they did in 2010 as they try to work through a crushing backlog that leaves callers reporting even some of the most serious crimes on hold, waiting for an officer to arrive.

A series by The New Orleans Advocate/WWL-TVhas uncovered New Orleans police are taking more than three times longer to respond to a typical call than they did in 2010 as the department faces a crushing backlog that leaves callers waiting hours or even days for an officer to arrive. And it?s not just run-of-the-mill theft and petty burglary reports stuck in the queue.

The New Orleans Police Department has taken pains to prioritize violent crimes, but a depleted force means cops are struggling to respond quickly to domestic disturbances, shootings and even murders.

How is this affecting New Orleans residents? Will the situation improve or get worse?

New Orleans Advocate and WWL-TV experts will take your questions about the series in a live chat below at noon Friday.

Having trouble viewing the chat below? Click here.