Candy

Images shared by Pearl River Police Department show a piece of Halloween candy with a needle inside. 

The Pearl River Police Department held a press conference Wednesday morning to further inform residents that a needle was found in a Kit Kat candy bar handed out to a 10-year boy while trick or treating on Halloween night.

Pearl River Police Chief "JJ" Jennings said no other town residents have reported finding similar objects in the sweets their children collected on Oct. 31, but added that the incident does not appear to be a "hoax." Jennings said the woman who reported the incident to police is a respected member of the community and that she closely inspected the candy her 10-year old son was given that evening. 

"Everything with this looks legit," Johnson said via telephone before Wednesday's press conference. "We may send the wrapper off to see if there's a pinhole in it; something that you can see under microscope."

When going through the boy's candy, the mother (who asked Pearl River police to not identify her by name) noticed the sharp object jutting from the side of the Kit Kat. She notified police, who have been in contact with the Hershey Company (which manufactures Kit Kat bars.) The company reported that the foreign object does not appear to have come from any of the equipment used in production, and that it uses a metal detector to locate any such hazards before its candy leaves the factory.

Jennings said the needle is definitely not from a hypodermic. It does not have an eye, like a sewing needle, and looks as if it might have been broken off from a safety pin or a piece of equipment. The object measures just under 1 inch long, the chief said.

The 10-year old boy who was given the candy is believed to have trick-or-treated in a four or five-block area near Pearl River High School on Oct. 31. Jennings noted that area is a popular one for trick-or-treating in the small town of 2,500 people.

"It's like a movie there were so many people out there," he said.

Jennings said the police department is asking everyone to thoroughly inspect their Halloween candy before consuming it. He said police hope to place flyers on the doors of each home in the area the boy trick-or-treated; urging citizens to look for signs of tampering on either the candy or wrapper. 

"We don't know, but it could be that someone put something in one piece of candy (at the store) and put the bag back on the shelf, which is really frightening," the chief said. "We've had no other complaints. But we've never had anything like this before in Pearl River."