Read their lips: no new taxes — or existing ones, for that matter.

That was the message St. Bernard Parish voters delivered Saturday, voting down a long list of millages — nearly all renewals — to pay for a variety of public services, including fire protection, garbage, libraries, recreation and road maintenance. If parish officials can’t figure out what to do without the millions lost for public services, they likely have time to ask voters to renew the existing taxes a second time. None expire until 2017 or later.

The list of losers included a 7.5-mill property tax that would have raised about $2.6 million annually for 30 years for building and maintaining levees and flood protection systems in the Lake Borgne Levee District. Proponents contended that the millage was needed to effectively operate and maintain the 60 miles of levees, 33 floodgates and two navigation floodgates in the area’s hurricane protection system.

The proposition lost by 1,830 votes, according to preliminary figures from the Louisiana Secretary of State’s office.

That was one of a dozen millages that St. Bernard voters rejected. A second new millage request was voted down by a nearly 2-to-1 margin. It would have put in place a new 3-mill, 10-year property tax that would have generated about $917,000 annually, starting next year, to pay for lights on streets, roads, highways, alleys and public places. It would have replaced an existing 1.23-mill property tax that is authorized through 2016.

That measure lost by 2,520 votes. Elsewhere on the ballot, parish voters decided to go along with changing part of the parish’s home rule charter, clarifying a 2009 provision that they had passed overwhelmingly at the time. The provision appeared to require Parish Council members to sit on the sidelines for a year after leaving office before they could run for another council seat or the parish presidency.

With Saturday’s vote, council members will be prohibited from holding another elected office “during the term for which (he or she was) elected to the council,” and can hold no appointed office until one year after stepping down.

The old language appeared to limit council members from running either for parish president or for other council seats, such as a district member seeking an at-large post, unless they resigned from the council at least a year before their new position would begin.

The change likely clears the way for some council members considering a run for parish president next year to do so without having to walk away from their current post in the meantime. The revision was proposed by Parish Council Chairman Guy McInnis, who has said that he is considering running for president. Former councilmen Tony “Ricky” Melerine and Wayne Landry also have expressed interest in facing off against incumbent President David Peralta, if Peralta runs for re-election, as he has promised.

With all precincts reporting:

Parishwide Home Rule Charter Amendment

Change clarifying a 5-year-old provision to specify that council members cannot hold another elected office “during the term for which (he or she was) elected to the council” and can hold no appointed office until one year after stepping down.

PASSED: 55-to-45 percent

Parishwide Lake Borgne Basin Levee District

To collect a new 7.5-mill property tax, generating an estimated $2,591,000 annually for 30 years, starting next year, to pay for building and maintaining levees and hurricane flood protection systems.

FAILED: 61-to-39 percent

Parishwide Proposition No. 1

To renew a 1.23-mill property tax, generating an estimated $381,000 per year, to pay for constructing, maintaining, improving and operating public libraries. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 35-to-65 percent

Parishwide Proposition No. 2

To renew a 2.47-mill property tax, generating an estimated $765,000 per year, to pay for constructing, maintaining, improving and operating public libraries in the parish and for purchasing books and other materials. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2020.

FAILED: 35-to-65 percent

Parishwide Proposition No. 3

To renew a 2.17-mill property tax, generating an estimated $672,000 per year, to pay for acquiring or improving lands, building and equipment for recreation purposes and maintaining and operating such recreation facilities. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 36-to-64 percent

Parishwide Proposition No. 4

To renew for another decade an existing 0.62-mill property tax authorized in 2006 — generating an estimated $192,000 annually — and redirect the money for building and maintaining public health units in the parish, and/or providing money for the Coroner’s Office, including maintaining facilities and equipment.

FAILED: 35-to-65 percent

Parishwide Proposition No. 5

To renew a 0.94-mill property tax, generating an estimated $291,000 per year, to pay for senior citizens programs, activities and services operated by the parish and/or the St. Bernard Parish Council on Aging. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 51-to-49 percent

Parishwide Garbage District No. 1

To renew a 3.05-mill property tax, generating an estimated $945,000 per year, to pay for providing and maintaining garbage collection and disposal services. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 37-to-63 percent

Parishwide Road District No. 1

To renew a 3.05-mill property tax, generating an estimated $945,000 per year, to pay for constructing, improving and maintaining public roads and highways. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 63-to-37 percent

Parishwide Road Lighting District No. 1

To approve a new 3-mill property tax, generating an estimated $917,000 annually for a decade, starting next year, to pay for lights on streets, roads, highways, alleys and public places. That millage would replace an existing 1.23-mill property tax that was authorized through 2016.

FAILED: 65-to-35 percent

Fire Protection District No. 1, Proposition 1

To renew a 2.73-mill property tax, generating an estimated $670,000 per year, to cover the cost of maintaining and operating fire protection facilities and obtaining water for firefighting, including charges for fire hydrant rentals and services. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2017.

FAILED: 57-to-43 percent

Fire Protection District No. 1, Proposition 2

To renew a 4.60-mill property tax, generating an estimated $1.1 million per year, to pay for acquiring, constructing, maintaining, improving and operating firefighting facilities and buying fire trucks and other equipment. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2019.

FAILED: 58-to-42 percent

Fire Protection District No. 2

To renew an 8.14-mill property tax, generating an estimated $519,000 per year, to pay for acquiring, constructing, maintaining, improving and operating firefighting facilities and buying fire trucks and other equipment. The 10-year renewal would have begun in 2019.

FAILED: 62-to-38 percent