OAKLAND, Calif. — Mark Jackson came to the Golden State Warriors talking big and brash. He promised playoff appearances and championships, and he delivered plenty of wins along the way.

Away from the court, though, Jackson never backed down from doing things how he wanted. His inability to mesh with management — and management’s inability to mesh with Jackson — increasingly overshadowed his success — and ultimately cost him his job.

The Warriors fired Jackson after three seasons Tuesday, ending the franchise’s most successful coaching tenure in the past two decades but also one filled with drama and distractions.

“Obviously it was not made exclusively on wins and losses,” Warriors owner Joe Lacob said.

Lacob and general manager Bob Myers both thanked Jackson, saying he helped make the Warriors a more attractive franchise. But Myers said the decision to dismiss Jackson was “unanimous” among the team’s executives — though still not easy — in part because the Warriors want a coach who can “develop a synergy” with everybody in basketball operations.

Jackson’s time with the Warriors will be remembered for the way he helped turn a perennially losing franchise into a consistent winner and the bold and bombastic way in which he did it.

He guaranteed Golden State would make the playoffs in his first season, then finished 23-36 after the NBA labor lockout. The Warriors went 47-35 last season and had a memorable run to the second round of the playoffs, and they were 51-31 this season before losing in seven games to the Los Angeles Clippers in the first round.

The Warriors, who have surrounded star Stephen Curry with a talented nucleus since Lacob’s group bought the franchise in 2010, had not made the playoffs in consecutive years since 1991-92. They had made the postseason once in 17 years before Jackson arrived.

Clippers president takes leave

NEW YORK — The NBA said Los Angeles Clippers President Andy Roeser is taking an indefinite leave of absence as the franchise tries to stabilize following owner Donald Sterling’s ban.

The league announced last week that it was working with the Clippers to appoint a new CEO. NBA spokesman Mike Bass said in a statement Tuesday that Roeser’s leave of absence, which begins immediately, “will provide an opportunity for a new CEO to begin on a clean slate and for the team to stabilize under difficult circumstances.”

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver banned Sterling for life and urged owners to force him to sell the Clippers for racist remarks he made.

Roeser is one of the league’s longest-tenured executives, having just completed his 30th season with the team.

The Clippers lead Oklahoma City 1-0 in the best-of-seven Western Conference semifinals.