Assignment secretary

Capital City Board of Volleyball Officials

This is Week 2 of the regular season. How did you think Week 1 went?

“I thought it went very well. We have the most officials we’ve ever had, and that makes it easier to handle the games we have. I was impressed by several of the teams I saw. I think the talent level overall is a little better than it was last year.”

How many officials do you have and how many games do you assign each week?

“We’re up to 52 officials, and there are several reasons for that. We have five officials who transferred in from other states, and they’re doing a great job. Plus, we made a big effort to recruit younger officials who recently finished their playing careers. On the average, we do 60 games from Monday through Thursday each week.”

How many officials does it take to handle a tournament like last weekend’s 35-team South Louisiana Volleyball Invitational?

“It depends on the number of courts you have. That tournament had five courts, so we wound up using 12 officials, and it worked out real well. The tournament was very competitive, which was good too. It was a great way to start the season.”

Is it easier to schedule games when you have a larger or smaller number of officials?

“Not having enough officials to cover all the games you need to cover is a big problem, which thankfully we don’t have. With more officials I find myself trying to balance things to make sure everyone gets the right number of assignments and same amount of travel. So there are issues both ways.”

What is the toughest rule for fans and/or coaches to interpret?

“The libero (defensive specialist) rule. We’ve had the libero rule for several years now, but people still get confused about how you can substitute using a libero and how the rotation and serving work.”

How did you get involved with volleyball officiating?

“I played at St. Joseph’s Academy (Class of 1979) and signed with Nicholls. When I came back home to go to LSU, I got involved to stay active and because I love the sport. We’re like our own family.”

Robin Fambrough