Drew Brees: If Saints see future franchise QB 'then by all means, draft him' _lowres

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) warms up before an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in New Orleans, Monday, Dec. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)

The New Orleans Saints are satisfied with carrying Drew Brees’ $30 million salary cap charge in the last year of his deal in 2016, according to his agent, Tom Condon.

Brees is headed into the final year of the five-year, $100 million deal he signed in 2012.

Because of the Saints’ lack of cap space and the fact that Brees could make it to free agency next season, there has been speculation the quarterback would sign an extension this offseason, but Condon indicated no deal is imminent in an appearance on “The Rich Eisen Show” on Wednesday.

“At one point, New Orleans wanted to talk about a cap redo, and Drew was more than happy to do that,” Condon said. “There were some intervening situations that occurred, so they didn’t need the cap room, and they seem to be satisfied with carrying that number right now.”

Condon was likely referring to the Saints’ pursuit of former Carolina cornerback Josh Norman, who became available unexpectedly right before the draft. Brees offered to redo his contract to bring Norman into the fold, but the Saints’ target chose Washington, eliminating the need for an immediate extension.

Now that the big money in free agency has been spent, New Orleans has little urgency to sign Brees to an extension right away. New Orleans still has only a little cap space remaining, but there aren’t any more players available who would command the kind of deal that would force the Saints to clear a large chunk of space.

Despite the air of uncertainty that comes with a player entering the final year of his contract, Condon said Brees remains committed to the Saints, a fact Brees himself has repeatedly stated by saying he wants to retire in New Orleans.

“Drew is committed to the city, and he loves this football team,” Condon said. “I think I have some insight as an ex-player, but I say to Drew, ‘Jeez, are you hoping they do better with your supporting cast,’ and he said, ‘Tommy, we have a really good young football team. We’re fine.’ ”

Rookie money

New Orleans’ first-round pick Sheldon Rankins signed a four-year deal worth $12.8 million, and a source provided The Advocate with the details.

2016

Cap number: $2,327,572

Base salary: $450,000 (fully guaranteed)

Signing bonus (prorated): $1,877,572

2017

Cap number: $2,909,465

Base salary: $1,032,893 (fully guaranteed)

Signing bonus (prorated): $1,877,572

2018

Cap number: $3,491,358

Base salary: $1,613,786 (fully guaranteed)

Signing bonus (prorated): $1,877,572

2019

Cap number: $4,073,251

Base salary: $2,195,679 (fully guaranteed)

Signing bonus (prorated): $1,877,572

Honey Badger home

Tyrann Mathieu is looking to give back to his hometown.

The Arizona Cardinals safety will be hosting a pair of events next month.

The first will be a football camp at Tad Gormley Stadium on June 4 for kids between the ages of 7 and 17. It is free to attend.

The other is a gala called “Hope for 2Morrow.” The gala is an annual event that supports local non-profits. Tickets can be purchased at eventbrite.com and start at $80. The event will feature entrees from local restaurants and entertainment.

Mathieu was vocal about the problems that face New Orleans residents after the shooting death of former New Orleans Saints defensive lineman Will Smith. Because of the high rate of violence, the safety said he does not like to stick around for more than a few days.

“I went back home a few weeks ago to bury my grandmother. It’s just the vibe I got when I landed in New Orleans. The culture is absolutely different,” Mathieu said in a recent radio interview with Fox Sports Radio. “I fly in and I fly out of town. That’s how scared I am. And this is where I come from. I love my city to death. But it’s senseless.”

Mathieu said he believes the issues start with the youth, who aren’t receiving the resources and opportunities needed to succeed.