Three events during the next two weeks will focus on Louisiana’s efforts to rebuild marshes, enhance wetlands and maintain and improve conditions in the Vermilion-Teche watershed.

The first comes up Tuesday: Coastal Connections — 6-8 p.m. at the LSU Center of River Studies, 100 Terrace Ave. in Baton Rouge — is a chance to see the Lower Mississippi River Physical Model, the extra-large model replicating flow, water levels and sediment transport of our country’s largest river.

The state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority also lay out plans for the Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton sediment diversion projects, both of which will affect recreational and commercial fishing interests.

Then from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Plantation Suite inside Nicholls State’s Bollinger Student Union in Thibodaux, America’s Wetlands will host the Coastal Wetland Communities Adaptation Leadership Forum.

Tops on the agenda is the Louisiana Coastal Exchange, which AW’s managing director Val Marmillion titled, “A Gulf Wide Private Sector Partnership & Registry of Conservation and Restoration Projects,” with as many as 19 state government, private industry, fishery, environmental and conservation organizations leaders participating in the presentation also involving the state’s Master Plan for restoring Louisiana’s coastal marshes.

Late next week, the Bayou Vermilion Preservation Association has scheduled a Sept. 7 5th annual River Symposium entitled “Contributing to the Tributaries: Community-Driven Watershed Management” from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. at Vermilionville near Lafayette.

The next day, Sept. 8, the BVPA is host for “The Teche-Vermilion Watershed: Building on Regional Progress,” with a host of speakers covering storm water, watershed management, state parks, nonpoint-source pollution.

Registration for both events if $27 ($5 for students) with two light meals included. For details, go to the BVPA website: bayouvermilionpreservation.org. A sunset cruise ($27) is also set for Sept. 7.