Made right next door in San Antonio, the Toyota Tundra is a classic example of how workers in the United States do things right. With its “everything’s bigger in Texas” attitude, the 2018 Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup with a workhorse attitude.

The Tundra can tow up to 10,200 pounds with standard hitch receivers. Some other pickups may be able to tow more, but the Tundra’s record for reliability makes it easier to give up a few towing pounds. Let’s put it this way, I have owned a Toyota Tundra pickup truck for the past 15 years and its odometer is nearing 200,000 miles. I stick to the factory maintenance schedule – thanks Team Toyota – and I have had zero trouble with my Tundra, towing my tractor and other farm equipment without worry.

For most drivers, the Tundra will have all the power you need. If you need to tow a 30,000-pound bulldozer, you’re gonna need more than a half-ton truck.

For 2018, Toyota moves to an all four-door line up with the Tundra, eliminating regular cab models. The new Tundra gets new front end styling, and has an all-V8 engine lineup. Every Tundra truck that rolls out of the San Antonio truck plant will also be equipped with Toyota Safety Sense, a comprehensive suite of technologies that includes pre-collision warning, lane departure alert, dynamic cruise control and automatic high beam headlights.

The Tundra is a serious workhorse in all respects. Two V8 engines are offered. There’s a 4.6-liter power plant that produces 310 horsepower and 327 lb.-ft. of torque, and a proven 5.7-liter V8 that kicks out 381 horses and 401 lb.-ft. of torque. The transmission is a 6-speed automatic.

The Tundra has a payload capacity of up to 1,730 pounds. The lockable tailgate is damped, making it easy to lift and lower. Just pull the latch and let it go.

Double Cab models, offered with either a 6.5-foot standard-bed or 8.1-foot long-bed configuration, use forward-hinged rear doors. The CrewMax, as the name implies, allows more room for passengers. The shorter 5.5-foot bed, combined with the longer cab, make room for 42.3 inches of rear seat legroom. Limited trim Double Cab models come standard with a power sliding horizontal rear window. CrewMax models have power rear glass that raises and lowers vertically with the push of a button, allowing easy access to the bed.

Like most pickup trucks today, the Tundra gives buyers a wide range of choices when it comes to the cabin. Whether your taste and budget lean toward durable fabric seats or fine leather upholstery, the Tundra has a selection for you.

Even the base model Tundra provides a nice list of amenities, including a rearview camera on a 6.1-inch touchscreen. Soft touch materials are in all the right places, and standard solar energy absorbing glass helps keep the cabin cooler and protect cabin surfaces. Logically grouped gauges are clear and easy to read. Knobs and buttons are large enough to be operated while wearing gloves.

Higher trim levels include the Limited and 1794 Edition, which commemorates the year that the Texas ranch which later became the Tundra plant was founded. My 1794 Edition test truck had as nice a cabin as I’ve seen in a truck. Heated and ventilated saddle brown premium leather seats are embossed with the 1794 logo, and the thick steering wheel has polished wood and leather trim. A huge console in the middle has file folder capability for the drivers whose office is their truck.

The SR grade comes with Entune Audio with an AM/FM CD player with MP3/WMA playback, an auxiliary jack and a USB port. SR5 and TRD Sport get Entune Audio Plus with navigation and a larger touchscreen. The Limited trim gets Entune Premium Audio with navigation and access to apps like iHeartRadio, MovieTickets.com, Open Table and Pandora. Platinum and 1794 Edition trims also get JBL Audio with navigation and Entune’s App Suite.

When it comes to safety, the 2018 Tundra has eight airbags and gets four overall stars in the government’s crash tests, including four stars in frontal crashes and five stars in side crashes. The Tundra scores “good” marks in moderate overlap and

2018 Toyota Tundra

Made right next door in San Antonio, the Toyota Tundra is a classic example of how workers in the United States do things right. With its “everything’s bigger in Texas” attitude, the 2018 Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup with a workhorse attitude.

The Tundra can tow up to 10,200 pounds with standard hitch receivers. Some other pickups may be able to tow more, but the Tundra’s record for reliability makes it easier to give up a few towing pounds. Let’s put it this way, I have owned a Toyota Tundra pickup truck for the past 15 years and its odometer is nearing 200,000 miles. I stick to the factory maintenance schedule – thanks Team Toyota – and I have had zero trouble with my Tundra, towing my tractor and other farm equipment without worry.

For most drivers, the Tundra will have all the power you need. If you need to tow a 30,000-pound bulldozer, you’re gonna need more than a half-ton truck.

For 2018, Toyota moves to an all four-door line up with the Tundra, eliminating regular cab models. The new Tundra gets new front end styling, and has an all-V8 engine lineup. Every Tundra truck that rolls out of the San Antonio truck plant will also be equipped with Toyota Safety Sense, a comprehensive suite of technologies that includes pre-collision warning, lane departure alert, dynamic cruise control and automatic high beam headlights.

The Tundra is a serious workhorse in all respects. Two V8 engines are offered. There’s a 4.6-liter power plant that produces 310 horsepower and 327 lb.-ft. of torque, and a proven 5.7-liter V8 that kicks out 381 horses and 401 lb.-ft. of torque. The transmission is a 6-speed automatic.

The Tundra has a payload capacity of up to 1,730 pounds. The lockable tailgate is damped, making it easy to lift and lower. Just pull the latch and let it go.

Double Cab models, offered with either a 6.5-foot standard-bed or 8.1-foot long-bed configuration, use forward-hinged rear doors. The CrewMax, as the name implies, allows more room for passengers. The shorter 5.5-foot bed, combined with the longer cab, make room for 42.3 inches of rear seat legroom. Limited trim Double Cab models come standard with a power sliding horizontal rear window. CrewMax models have power rear glass that raises and lowers vertically with the push of a button, allowing easy access to the bed.

Like most pickup trucks today, the Tundra gives buyers a wide range of choices when it comes to the cabin. Whether your taste and budget lean toward durable fabric seats or fine leather upholstery, the Tundra has a selection for you.

Even the base model Tundra provides a nice list of amenities, including a rearview camera on a 6.1-inch touchscreen. Soft touch materials are in all the right places, and standard solar energy absorbing glass helps keep the cabin cooler and protect cabin surfaces. Logically grouped gauges are clear and easy to read. Knobs and buttons are large enough to be operated while wearing gloves.

Higher trim levels include the Limited and 1794 Edition, which commemorates the year that the Texas ranch which later became the Tundra plant was founded. My 1794 Edition test truck had as nice a cabin as I’ve seen in a truck. Heated and ventilated saddle brown premium leather seats are embossed with the 1794 logo, and the thick steering wheel has polished wood and leather trim. A huge console in the middle has file folder capability for the drivers whose office is their truck.

The SR grade comes with Entune Audio with an AM/FM CD player with MP3/WMA playback, an auxiliary jack and a USB port. SR5 and TRD Sport get Entune Audio Plus with navigation and a larger touchscreen. The Limited trim gets Entune Premium Audio with navigation and access to apps like iHeartRadio, MovieTickets.com, Open Table and Pandora. Platinum and 1794 Edition trims also get JBL Audio with navigation and Entune’s App Suite.

When it comes to safety, the 2018 Tundra has eight airbags and gets four overall stars in the government’s crash tests, including four stars in frontal crashes and five stars in side crashes. The Tundra scores “good” marks in moderate overlap and side crash tests, and “marginal” in the driver’s side small overlap front crash test from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

2018 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition Crewmax

Engine: 5.7-liter V8

Horsepower/Torque: 381/401 lb.-ft.

Transmission: 6-speed automatic

Price: $50,130 ($54,721 with options & freight)

EPA mileage estimates: 13 mpg city/17mpg highway/14 mpg combined

Estimated highway range: 646 miles