Eye scanner LSU

LSU's recreational center and Tiger Stadium weight room are two places on campus experimenting with eye-scanning technology as a way to allow access, according to LSU spokesman Ernie Ballard.

Almost gone are the days when an LSU student would swipe his or her school ID and walk into the university's recreation center.

The rec center and Tiger Stadium weight room are two places on campus experimenting with eye-scanning technology as a way to allow access, according to LSU spokesman Ernie Ballard.

Here's how the process works, for example, at the rec: Students can still swipe their IDs cards. Or, they have the option to have their eyes scanned.

An iris code -- a series of numbers, not an actual image of a person's eyes -- is created and "stored locally on a secure database that even UREC cannot access," Ballard said. When a student's eyes are scanned, that information is used to verify the student's identity.

"This is not storage of any biomedical information," Ballard said.

The device at the rec is an Iris ID iCam 7 series, which retails for about $2,100.

Tim Meyerhoff, director of sales in North America for Iris, said an increasing number of universities are using the technology.

"Aside from the rec center, dining hall applications have become relatively popular," he said.

It's unclear if LSU plans to roll this out at other sites around campus.


Follow Kyle Whitfield on Twitter, @kyle_whitfield.​