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Jim Bernhard, a prominent Baton Rouge businessman, urged residents to wear masks in public places during a press conference held by Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome. 

Gov. John Bel Edwards appointed Wednesday four new members to the LSU Board of Supervisors – replacing members selected by former Gov. Bobby Jindal and taking full control of the 16-member body that oversees the colleges, agricultural programs and the Baton Rouge flagship university.

In a press release, Edwards tapped Patrick C. “Pat” Morrow, an Opelousas lawyer, and Monroe’s Raymond R. “Randy” Morris, owner of West Carroll Health Systems, to represent the 5th U.S. Congressional District on the board. They replace R. Blake Chatelain, an Alexandria bank executive, and James Moore, a Monroe business executive, appointed by Jindal. Their terms expired on June 1.

Jim M. Bernhard Jr., a Baton Rouge businessman who founded Bernhard Capital Partners, was picked to replace Jindal-appointee Bobby Yarborough, chief executive officer of Manda Fine Meats, to represent the 6th U.S. Congressional District.

Stephen Perry, of New Orleans, will be replaced by Collis B. Temple Jr., of Baton Rouge and chief executive officer of Harmony Center and C. T. Construction.

Though a handful of the supervisors were originally named by previous governors, all 15 of the 16 – one is a student who serves for a single year – now have been chosen by Edwards for staggered six-year terms.

The board makes the final decisions on everything LSU including how much to pay everyone from janitors and faculty to the head football coach. They decide how LSU’s vast property holdings are used and sign off on leadership choices.

Last month, the board made the controversial decision to remove the name of former chancellor Troy Middleton from the LSU Baton Rouge campus’s main library. Though a war hero, Middleton also was involved in efforts during the 1950s and 1960s to keep African Americans from enrolling at LSU.

The LSU System has nine learning institutions scattered around the state including a two-year college, a law school and two medical schools. LSU ultimately is in charge of the state’s public hospitals, contracting private firms to administer most and personally managing the Lallie Kemp Regional Medical Center in Independence. Additionally, LSU provides agricultural cooperative extension services in all 64 parishes.