Small groups of right-wing protesters — some of them carrying rifles — gathered outside heavily fortified statehouses around the country Sunday, including in Baton Rouge, outnumbered by troops and police brought in to prevent a repeat of the violence that erupted at the U.S. Capitol.

As darkness began to fall, there were no reports of any clashes.

Security was stepped up in recent days after the FBI warned of the potential for armed protests in Washington and at all 50 state capitol buildings ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday.

Crowds of only a dozen or two dozen people demonstrated at some boarded-up, cordoned-off statehouses, while the streets in many other capital cities remained empty.

About three dozen supporters of Donald Trump came to the State Capitol in Baton Rouge on Saturday, as they do most weekends. But their speakers thanked the police and reiterated that they were peacefully protesting.

“We are Americans who love our country and despise insurrection,” said John Santiago from the Capitol steps. Pointing to the State Capitol, he added, “This is a hallowed building.”

They left after about two hours to eat pizza for lunch.

Only a few people showed up Sunday and they weren't necessarily there because of Trump. Three men, dressed in camouflage and carrying weapons, weren’t pro-Trump but were there, they said, to engage in dialogue. Few were around with whom to hold conversation.

One man held a sign supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. A woman held a sign that questioned the validity of the presidential election results.

The only clear Trump supporter was Austin, of Port Allen, who wouldn’t give his last name. Dressed in a blue blazer and a red Make America Great Again, MAGA cap. Austin said he feared that dressing in camouflage would provoke the media to tarnish Trump supporters. He was disappointed so few were there to join him.

Police and media outnumbered everyone else.

The three men with guns spent most of the time discussing politics with Austin or passersby. They argued that neither left nor right wings were properly representing regular people — elected officials on both sides only work to tighten government’s authority that increases control over the people. They said voters need an alternative to only Democratic and Republican candidates.

Austin countered that it was really the Democrats sowing discontent while the president worked hard for regular people.

But Galaxy – one of the armed men who he wouldn’t give his real name publicly – said Trump is pretty much the same as President-elect Joe Biden.

Brooke David, a 20-year-old LSU student from New Orleans who had been passing through the State Capitol gardens on a Sunday walk, was drawn into the discussion briefly. They asked about her political views after finding out she cast her ballot for Biden and probed for points of agreement.

“It was interesting,” said David, adding that she wasn’t at all uncomfortable talking to armed men.

Some protesters across the country said they came out to Sunday's protests to back President Donald Trump. Others said they had instead come to voice their support for gun rights or oppose government overreach.

“I don’t trust the results of the election,” said Michigan protester Martin Szelag, a 67-year-old semi-retired window salesman from Dearborn Heights. He wore a sign around his neck that read, in part, “We will support Joe Biden as our President if you can convince us he won legally. Show us the proof! Then the healing can begin.”

As the day wore on with no bloodshed around the U.S., a sense of relief spread among officials, though they were not ready to let their guard down.

The heavy law enforcement presence may have kept turnout down. In the past few days, some extremists had warned others against falling into what they called a law enforcement trap.

Washington State Patrol spokesman Chris Loftis said he hoped the apparently peaceful day reflected some soul-searching among Americans.

“I would love to say that it’s because we’ve all taken a sober look in the mirror and have decided that we are a more unified people than certain moments in time would indicate,” he said.

The security measures were intended to safeguard seats of government from the type of violence that broke out at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, when far-right Trump supporters galvanized by his false claims that the election had been stolen from him overran the police and bashed their way into building while Congress was certifying the Electoral College vote.

The attack left a Capitol police officer and four others dead. More than 125 people have been arrested over the insurrection.

Dozens of courts, election officials and Trump’s own attorney general have all said there was no evidence of widespread fraud in the presidential race.

On Sunday, some statehouses were surrounded by new security fences, their windows were boarded up, and extra officers were on patrol. Legislatures generally were not in session over the weekend.

Tall fences also surrounded the U.S. Capitol. The National Mall was closed to the public, and the mayor of Washington asked people not to visit. Some 25,000 National Guard troops from around the country are expected to arrive in the city in the coming days.

The roughly 20 protesters who showed up at Michigan’s Capitol, including some who were armed, were significantly outnumbered by law enforcement officers and members of the media.

At the Ohio Statehouse, about two dozen people, including several carrying long guns, protested outside under the watchful eyes of state troopers before dispersing as it began to snow.

Kathy Sherman, who was wearing a visor with “Trump” printed on it, said she supports the president but distanced herself from the mob that breached the U.S. Capitol.

"I’m here to support the right to voice a political view or opinion without fear of censorship, harassment or the threat of losing my job or being physically assaulted,” she said.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, a Republican, said he was pleased with the outcome but stressed that authorities "continue to have concerns for potential violence in the coming days, which is why I intend to maintain security levels at the Statehouse as we approach the presidential inauguration.”

At Oregon's Capitol, fewer than a dozen men wearing military-style outfits, black ski masks and helmets stood nearby with semiautomatic weapons slung across their bodies. Some had upside-down American flags and signs reading such things as “Disarm the government.”

At the Texas Capitol, Ben Hawk walked with about a dozen demonstrators up to the locked gates carrying a bullhorn and an AR-15 rifle hanging at the side of his camouflage pants. He condemned the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and said he did not support Trump.

“All we came down here to do today was to discuss, gather, network and hang out. And it got blown and twisted completely out of proportion,” Hawk said.

At Nevada's Capitol, where demonstrators supporting Trump have flocked most weekends in recent months, all was quiet except for a lone protester with a sign.

“Trump Lost. Be Adults. Go Home,” it read.

More than a third of governors had called out the National Guard to help protect their capitols and assist local law enforcement. Several governors declared states of emergency, and others closed their capitols to the public until after Biden's inauguration.

Some legislatures also canceled sessions or pared back their work for the coming week.

Even before the violence at the Capitol, some statehouses had been the target of vandals and angry protesters during the past year.

Last spring, armed protesters entered the Michigan Capitol to object to coronavirus lockdowns. People angry over the death of George Floyd under a Minneapolis police officer's knee vandalized capitols in several states, including Colorado, Ohio, Texas and Wisconsin.

Last last month, crowds in Oregon forced their way into the Capitol in Salem to protest its closure to the public during a special legislative session on coronavirus measures.

Amid the potential for violence in the coming days, the building's first-floor windows were boarded up and the National Guard was brought in.

"The state Capitol has become a fortress,” said Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney, a Democrat. “I never thought I’d see that. It breaks my heart.”

Email Mark Ballard at mballard@theadvocate.com.