The United States is a nation founded on the rule of law. Laws are meant to protect citizens from exploitation by organized interests, secular and religious. Businesses need regulation to protect people from greed. Laws, enforced by the federal government, ensure that citizens' rights do not depend on the vagaries local law enforcement. Consistency is equality.

Government's main job is in property management. It makes the laws and write the leases that corporations operate under. Oil pipelines rent public property to make money for their shareholders. Every other goal — jobs, environment, children — is expendable in the quest for dividends.

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From left, New Orleans' Aniu White Wolf holds a Native American medicine wheel sign, as St. James resident Eve Butler and New Orleans' Rebecca King and Susan Prevost hold a banner showing an idyllic cypress and water scene with power generating solar panels and wind turbines serving as alternatives to oil-based energy, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017.

Environmental activists demonstrated outside the Governor's Mansion and the Louisiana Capitol Thursday in opposition to the proposed Bayou Bridge Pipeline.

Hoisting signs with slogans like "If you love it, protect it," about 20 people called on the state government to slow down work in deference to South Louisiana's wetlands and waterways.

If she had John Bel Edwards's ear, demonstrator Cherri Foytlin would ask the governor to perform an environmental impact study and investigate Energy Transfer Partners, the company petitioning to build the oil line. The proposal still requires approval from the state Department of Environmental Quality.

The pipeline will cross the Atchafalaya Basin, where crawfishermen are already struggling to haul in a catch, and conclude in the River Parishes, where it poses a risk to locals' drinking water said Foytlin, of the conservation group Bold Louisiana.

"(Edwards) needs to figure out who his allegience is to," she said.

Environmental activists demonstrated outside the Governor's Mansion and the Louisiana Capitol Thursday in opposition to the proposed Bayou Bridge Pipeline.

Hoisting signs with slogans like "If you love it, protect it," about 20 people called on the state government to slow down work in deference to South Louisiana's wetlands and waterways.

If she had John Bel Edwards's ear, demonstrator Cherri Foytlin would ask the governor to perform an environmental impact study and investigate Energy Transfer Partners, the company petitioning to build the oil line. The proposal still requires state approval.

The pipeline will cross the Atchafalaya Basin, where crawfishermen are already struggling to haul in a catch, and conclude in the River Parishes, where it poses a risk to locals' drinking water said Foytlin, of the conservation group Bold Louisiana.

"(Edwards) needs to figure out who his allegience is to," she said.

The laws are in place to demand due diligence for rental agreements. Security deposits, cleaning fees and other details are hammered out according to law to protect our common wealth. How does renting our property benefit us and our children? Isn't it too messy? And antiquated? Who profits? Our state is negotiating the lease for a pipeline to rent public property.

This is why choosing lawmakers is critical to freedom.

Robyn Blanpied

Guest column: Why we're fighting Bayou Bridge pipeline

USAF, retired

Madisonville