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LSU head coach Les Miles doesn't like the call during the second half of the LSU Wisconsin football game Saturday Sept. 3, 2016, at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Wisconsin won 16-14.

Les Miles is now the head coach at the University of Kansas, but it was elements from his LSU tenure that drew headlines this week.

Those were spurred by the revelation of a decade-old settlement that the longtime Tigers coach reached with a student, first reported by The Advocate's Andrea Gallo and Brooks Kubena Tuesday afternoon.


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The LSU coach's lawyers are also at the center of a court battle with another news outlet over the release of records regarding a years-old investigation from his time with the program. 

But what are the key elements to be aware of ahead of the findings from a larger ongoing investigation at LSU? Scroll below for a breakdown of five things to know regarding the settlement, past investigation, upcoming report and more.


WHAT THE SETTLEMENT INVOLVED

The settlement that came to light this week occurred about a decade ago, around the time LSU and Miles were working to close a multiyear contract extension. The complaint involved an LSU intern, who accused the Tigers football coach of "hitting on her."

Little is known at this point about the terms of the settlement, though LSU officials confirmed Wednesday that they heard about the settlement but said the university was not a party to it and they had not seen it. 


WHAT MILES HAD TO SAY

When reached this week, Miles denied the allegations of making advances on a student.

"That's not true," he said.

Miles did not directly address questions regarding the settlement.

Peter Ginsberg, a longtime attorney for Miles based in New York, said a description of the settlement was "discernibly incomplete and inaccurate." He did not respond to follow-up questions regarding the existence of a settlement.


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WHERE THE NEWS CAME FROM

The settlement has surfaced amid a larger probe into LSU's handling of sexual misconduct and domestic violence allegations at the university and within its athletics programs. LSU hired the law firm Husch Blackwell to conduct the investigation.

The firm is expected to deliver a report late next week on its findings from those incidents, which span into the tenure of current LSU head coach Ed Orgeron.


ANOTHER INVESTIGATION

Miles was the target of a sexual harassment investigation in 2013, USA Today reported Wednesday.

USA Today -- which broke the story in November that prompted the larger investigation -- reported that the investigation involved allegations that Miles sexually harassed student workers and made sexist comments about others. They reported that Miles' actions were deemed improper, but that LSU declined to discipline him. 

A request for a copy of the investigation was denied by LSU attorneys, who cited the Louisiana constitution and Miles' right to privacy. USA Today has since filed a lawsuit against LSU, with its attorneys arguing that Miles' level of celebrity in Louisiana and position of prominence at the public university justified the release of the records.

Miles' attorneys have joined that litigation and have stated that the records "have little relevance to a legitimate subject of public interest."


THE STATUS OF THAT LAWSUIT

Baton Rouge District Judge Chip Moore has scheduled a hearing for March 30 to determine whether the Miles report should be released to the public.

Miles' attorneys, New Orleans-based J. Christopher Zainey Jr. and Ginsberg, previously filed a petition for a court-issued restraining order forbidding LSU from releasing records from the investigation, conducted by the law firm Taylor Porter. Moore granted the order, but he and the attorneys have each had the chance to review the records. 

LSU and USA Today's attorney remain under order not to disclose those records until Moore reaches a decision. It remains to be seen what, if any, effect the order could have on Husch Blackwell's ability to reference the investigation by Taylor Porter in their review.

Advocate reporters Andrea Gallo and Brooks Kubena contributed to this report.

Email Jeff Nowak at jnowak@theadvocate.com

Twitter: @Jeff_Nowak