The Decatur Street restaurant Trinity (1117 Decatur St.) has closed, just about three years after it debuted with a bid to raise the ranks of upscale dining in its part of the French Quarter.

The restaurant served its last meal on April 22. However, owner Hugh Uhalt said he has plans in the works for a new concept to take over the space later this year. He said he wasn't ready to detail the new plan, but he sounded upbeat about the change.

“We think it will fit the neighborhood better, there’s a lot of people who do well down here and we just think we needed to change the concept,” Uhalt said.

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The longtime home of Maximo's on Decatur Street became the contemporary Creole restaurant Trinity.

Trinity opened in May 2016, taking over an address that had long been home to the upscale/casual Italian restaurant Maximo’s. That restaurant had been a French Quarter hot spot for years, beginning in the 1980s. However, Maximo's had gone through a few iterations before quietly closing in 2015.

Uhalt, a local developer, bought the property and completed a renovation that flowed across the long front bar, the main dining room with its open kitchen and dining bar and a second floor dining room, with outdoor seating on a gallery over Decatur Street.

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Tobiko caviar top the baked oysters at Trinity in the French Quarter.

Trinity served a contemporary Creole menu with a touch of Asian flavors. It was a notable addition for upscale dining in a part of town thick with casual restaurants and touristy spots.

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Among the many bars and casual eateries on Decatur Street, Trinity marked a departure with upscale contemporary Creole cuisine.

Angeline, an impressive upscale modern Southern restaurant two blocks away, closed last year around this time. Part of the Hotel Provincial, Angeline's space is now run by the hotel and is no longer an independent restaurant.

Like its neighbors along the block, Trinity’s building was once owned by the Ursuline nuns, whose historic Old Ursuline Convent abuts the property.

By the 1920s, when this part of the Quarter was full of Italian groceries and food distributors tied to the nearby French Market, the building was home to a fruit company. That’s when its distinctive plasterwork façade with decorative cornucopias was added.

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The Decatur Street address of Trinity was once home to a fruit company, which is still reflected in the decorative facade.


Follow Ian McNulty on Twitter, @IanMcNultyNOLA.