Leaders of the Jesuit religious order released a list of 42 priests and other members Friday morning who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse, including 19 who worked in New Orleans and surrounding areas.

The list, provided by the Jesuits’ U.S. Central and Southern Province, followed a similar release last month by New Orleans Archbishop Gregory Aymond, which named 57 priests and deacons who allegedly abused minors over the past several decades.

Nineteen people on the Jesuits' list had ties to the New Orleans area, to institutions such as Jesuit High School, Loyola University and Immaculate Conception Church. Eleven of those names were not on the list released by the Archdiocese of New Orleans. 

Read the full list below (click here for more)

Allegations for the top six names relate to time at Jesuit High School: 

  • Cornelius Carr (1976-1980; priest; religion teacher, chairman of religion affairs, associate chaplain; member of the New York province)
  • Edward DeRussy (1969-1978; priest; English and Latin teacher)
  • Donald Dickerson (1973-1975; scholastic; English and theology teacher)
  • Francis Landwermeyer (1961-1962; scholastic; English and Latin teacher)
  • Claude Ory (1973-1980; religious brother; maintenance staff)
  • J. Donald Pearce (1960-1968; priest; Spanish teacher, prefect of discipline, president)

ADDITIONAL NAMES

  • Michael O. Barry, SJ
  • Charles Bartles, SJ
  • Jody Blanchard, SJ
  • Claude P. Boudreaux, SJ
  • John Campbell, SJ
  • Mark A. Clark, SJ
  • Francis X. Cleary SJ
  • James A. Condon, SJ (Chicago Province which is now part of USA Midwest Province)
  • Charles G. Coyle, SJ
  • Burton J. Fraser, SJ (Wisconsin Province which is now part of USA Midwest Province)
  • Chester E. Gaiter, SJ
  • Thomas J. Hatrel, SJ
  • Thomas J. Hidding, SJ
  • John W. Hough, SJ
  • Francis J. Kegel, SJ
  • Dennis P. Kirchoff, SJ
  • Bernard P. Knoth, SJ (Chicago Province which is now part of USA Midwest Province)
  • Philip D. Kraus, SJ
  • Gerhardt B. Lehmkuhl, SJ
  • Alfonso Madrid, SJ (Province of Mexico)
  • Eugene A. Maio, SJ
  • Vincent R. Malatesta, SJ
  • James L. McShane, SJ
  • Edward P. Murphy, SJ
  • Thomas J. Naughton, SJ (Priest of the New Orleans Province, NOT Brother Thomas Naughton of the Missouri Province)
  • Patrick H. O’Liddy, SJ
  • Vincent A. Orlando, SJ
  • Austin N. Park SJ
  • George M. Pieper, SJ
  • Paul C. Pilgram, SJ
  • Elmo J. Rogero, SJ
  • Norman J. Rogge, SJ
  • Anthony J. Short, SJ
  • Arthur O. Verdieck, SJ
  • Richard H. Witzofsky, SJ (Brother)
  • Benjamin Wren, SJ

"We make this acknowledgment to help victims heal. We remain committed to protecting the privacy of victims, most of whom request confidentiality when approaching the school or province,"read a statement from Jesuit High School accompanying the release. "We make this acknowledgment to help victims heal. We remain committed to protecting the privacy of victims, most of whom request confidentiality when approaching the school or province." 

While some Jesuit priests who worked in New Orleans schools and parishes had already been named by the archdiocese, the order also provided names of religious brothers and men studying to be Jesuits while teaching locally.

The list from the Jesuits, which covers the past 63 years, comes as Catholic leaders locally as well as across the U.S. have begun to recognize the need for greater transparency on abuse that occurred at the hands of the church over the past several decades.

Roughly a third of U.S. dioceses have released or plan to release lists, and Jesuit provinces covering much of the rest of the U.S. have made plans to make similar releases, according to the order's America magazine.

The Jesuits — an order known for a commitment to education and social justice — are comprised of roughly 16,000 religious men, making them the world’s largest male Catholic religious order. Their presence in Louisiana mainly centers on running Jesuit High School and Loyola University in New Orleans.

They also run churches named Immaculate Conception in downtown New Orleans and north Baton Rouge, the Manresa silent retreat home in Convent, and a spirituality center at Grand Coteau. They previously ran Loyola College Prep in Shreveport but gave the school to the local diocese in the 1980s.

Six Jesuit priests were included in the list of 57 credibly accused diocesan and religious order clergy released on Nov. 2 by Aymond, a disclosure motivated in part by a Pennsylvania grand jury report this summer that exposed numerous previously unreported sexual abuse allegations involving hundreds of priests there.

The Jesuits used to have a New Orleans province but then folded it into one based in St. Louis. In addition to Louisiana, the U.S. Central and Southern Province governs institutions and personnel in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, southern Illinois, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Texas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, the territory of Puerto Rico and the Central American nation of Belize.

Information from The Advocate staff writer Ramon Antonio Vargas was used in this report.