Today

Screenshot via video from Today with Hoda & Jenna. 

The hosts of Today with Hoda and Jenna seem to get the idea, but they are not on board with the term "go-cup," which was announced as an addition to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary this week. 

Hosts Meredith Viera and Jenna Bush Hager looked perplexed on Tuesday as they discussed the term. Bush Hager insisted she knows the term, but puts her beverages "in a to-go cup." They asked social media producer Donna Farizan why the "to" wasn't included.

"I don’t know, because they’re like ‘cool,’ " Farizan joked. 

Can't see the clip below? Click here. 

"Why do these words need to be in a dictionary?" Viera asked. "But these are words that are going to come and go. They’re not words like 'octopus'. ... It shouldn't be in there, it should be 'go-away cup.' ” 

Viera was filling in for regular host Hoda Kotb, who is out on maternity leave after the adoption of her second child, Hope Catherine, earlier this month. Kotb likely would have had some insight on the walking drink concept, considering her deep ties to the New Orleans area that include serving as an anchor for WWL-TV from 1992-'98. 

Kotb and Bush Hager were in New Orleans for a broadcast of the show in October, staging a small parade for a grand entrance. 

“What I miss about New Orleans: everything,” said Kotb at the time. “I miss the feeling when you wake up. I miss the feeling of a random hug on the street. I miss the feeling of, like, music coming out of places. I miss the warmth."

"Go-cup" made Merriam-Webster's cut this year, one of 640 words selected for inclusion in the dictionary. 

It’s defined as “a plastic or paper cup used especially for taking a beverage off the premises of a bar, restaurant, etc.” The use of a go-cup is regular practice in New Orleans due in large part to open container laws that allow alcoholic beverages to be consumed in public as long as the container is not made of glass. Drinks in glasses or bottles are commonly poured into plastic cups before they're taken to the outside world.  

“The English language never sleeps, and neither does the dictionary. The work of revising a dictionary is constant, and it mirrors the culture’s need to make sense of the world with words,” Merriam-Webster's press release said.

The list included updated definitions for politically tilted words like "snowflake" and "purple," the latter including a reference to define geographical areas where democrats and republicans are split.

Other phrases include “gig economy,” and “gender nonconforming,” tech terms like “page view” and “screen time,” and foodie trends inspired entries such as “chai latte” and “steak (non-meat).” 

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